PSQM

Is there a place for Science Capital in the primary classroom?

Is there a place for Science Capital in the primary classroom?

Inspired by my utter failure to mention science capital during last night's joint #ASEChat with #PrimaryRocks, I thought I should express my thoughts about science capital. 

Just the beginning...

Just the beginning...

The start of this blog post comes on the tube journey home from possibly the proudest moments in my career. I have just attended the Primary Science Quality Mark award evening and collected the silver award for my school. I have always been passionate about primary science, but the energy, enthusiasm and sense of pride felt after the ceremony has reignited my passion.

Testing science

Testing science

This month has seen the annual SATs testing of all Year 6 children up and down the country. Also, as I write this, my loving and delightful Year 2 children are embarking on their end of Key Stage assessments. It has been well documented that children have been in tears over the content and the pitch of these statutory assessments. Sadly, I have to confess, I've seen a trace of this disbelief from the children in the pitch of the KS1 assessments. Yes, I've taught Year 2 for the past three years and the shift in the expectations from new assessments in reading and mathematics has increased. While I haven't witnessed any children in tears, you could almost certainly feel the confidence and children's love for learning sink as the tests progressed. This hasn't been helped by the constant 'teaching to the test' that appears to happen in Year 6 classrooms across the country as the SATs approach.

Becoming a leader - having the conviction

Becoming a leader - having the conviction

Reflecting on my blog post from last week and looking at the #SLTChat topic - nurturing leaders, here are my thoughts on tacking leadership in the world of primary education. As I discussed last week, I am in my third year of teaching. Let's just stop there. I qualified in 2013. Already, I am the science subject leader of a one form entry primary school in Westminster. Doesn't that deserve praise? Why then don't I cut myself some slack? While I appreciate that everybody's career develops at a very different rate, I can't help but feel disappointed, especially at the start of this academic year. I wasn't sure why. I have good relationships with my colleagues, parents and, of course, the children I teach. In my NQT year I was subject to a LA review and then an OFSTED inspection. I achieved good results in Year 2 SATs and subsequently became science subject leader in my second year along with being moderated for SATs data last year.