Early career crossroads

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As with most of the country, I am currently suffering from the delightful January blues. In the world of education, January is a rather odd month. Aside from the very real lack of sunshine (travelling to and from school in darkness), it makes you think. While the 1st of January brings promise and New Years Resolutions, in academic terms, we're nearly at the half-way mark. As a result, it can be very easy to begin thinking of September 2016 and what the next academic year will bring. This is my dilemma.

I am in my third year of teaching and I'm finding it somewhat of a bizarre, almost transition period. I know I am incredibly lucky to work in a supportive school and I've been blessed with the opportunities that have been given to me in a relatively short period of time. However, have I lost a sense of who I am? I've been consumed with planning and assessment of my current cohort and the gargantuan pile of work that goes with teaching Year 2 (let's not mention the removal of levels quite yet. That's another blog entry!). That's not to say I don't enjoy the day-to-day teaching, planning, assessment cycle that comes with the territory, I do. Really. Despite this, I am constantly thinking who am I as a teacher? What do I want from my career? Am I being selfish for thinking about me? What about the children I teach? Shouldn't I put them first.

Yes, I'm aware I've just bombarded you with an array of questions. But that's what January does. It has really made me take stock of my career and think about where I'm headed.

I know I would run before I can walk. I'm always itching to move on, move forward. I have a short attention span. Combine this with an overwhelming drive to have a successful career and a slight obsession with being 'perfect' I feel I've been on a collision course. I'm now taking stock of my position. I need to embrace this supportive environment.

So, 2016 is the year of Mr Church. I am extremely passionate about primary science and can happily talk for hours (days probably!) about teaching science in the primary school. So that's what I'm going to aim to achieve. I see education as more than what happens in one class, in one school. It's about the wider community, of teachers, professionals, parents, children.